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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  March 7, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. wikileaks has published thousands of documents it says contain details of cia hacking techniques. the replacement for obamacare plan has been unveiled. we'll be live in washington. iraqi forces strike another blow against the islamic state group in mosul. iraq's prime minister has been there. translation: they will either surrender and have a fair trial, their second choice is they will be killed. here in the uk, the government has suffered its second defeat in a week in the upper house of parliament over brexit. the lords want a bigger say for parliament on any final deal. and we'll bring you a bbc investigation into facebook that finds it failed to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. this is a tweet from wikileaks.
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it told us that it was releasing false southern part one inside the cia's global hacking force and it was claiming the thousands of documents it has put online have shown us how the cia conducts hacking. —— vault seven. shown us how the cia conducts hacking. -- vault seven. the bbc contacted the cia and it said we do not comment on purported intelligence documents. let me show you what gordon corera, our intelligence correspondent, said. they claim to be from the cia centre for cyber intelligence, leaked documents about the cia's technical ability to carry out hacking into electronic devices, things like android phones, iphones, even in one interesting document samsung smart tvs , interesting document samsung smart tvs, so it could make it look like
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the tv is off and actually on and collecting audio from the room and sending it back from a joint operation with britain's mi5, it is claimed. extraordinary claims about the capabilities of the cia has for hacking into electronic devices. links from the hundred days programme spoke to the former cia director and former nsa director general michael hayden. here is what he had to say about the sleek. the agency is not yet confirming or denying the authenticity so i've got to put that out there. now, if what i have read is true then this seems to be an incredibly damaging leak in terms of the tactics, procedures and tools used by the central intelligence agency to conduct legitimate foreign intelligence. in other words, it's made my country and my country's friends less safe. edward snowden who knows a thing or two about lea ks has edward snowden who knows a thing or two about leaks has posted online, still working through the
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publication but what wikileaks has here is genuinely a big deal. he says it looks authentic, although we should emphasise, we are not able to confirm that is the case. as we a lwa ys confirm that is the case. as we always do at this time, let's bring up always do at this time, let's bring up the bbc‘s anthony zurcher live from washington, dc. edward snowden says it is a big deal, is that the thought in washington? there is concern that it has revealed techniques the cia has used to gather intelligence through electronic means such as hacking and trojan horses and malware, and also taking advantage of existing floors in technological devices like iphones —— flaws. and even cars and apps you might have around your house, the television connected to the internet. these are all methods this eia developed and now they are being revealed. interestingly the obama administration said that whenever they came across a pre—existing problem or a weakness
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ina pre—existing problem or a weakness in a technological device that they would reveal it and would not hoard it and sit on it. this seems to run counter to those promises. one story i wanted to ask about. donald trump tuk—tuk twittered today to say our wonderful new health care bill is out for review and negotiation and says obamaca re is out for review and negotiation and says obamacare is complete and total disaster and it is imploding fast. not everyone agrees with that. the president himself said it had some good features a few weeks ago when he talked about it. evidently he has changed his mind. what we can agree on is the bill is available to read on is the bill is available to read on the public and party website. the us health secretary gave a press conference earlier. let me play you some of that. what's happening now is the american people are having to sacrifice in order to purchase coverage and as i mentioned many individuals can't afford the kind of coverage they have now so they have the insurance card but they don't have care. our desire is to drive down the health care costs for everybody and the way that you do thatis
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everybody and the way that you do that is increased choices for folks, increased competition, return the regulation of health care where it ought to be which is at the state level, not the federal level. all of these things, which taken in their aggregate, will in fact decreased the cost of health care and health coverage and that will allow folks to purchase the coverage they want. the plan is for the first vote to be on this on wednesday and that hasn't gone down well with some democrats. jim cooper represents nashville and says obamaca re was jim cooper represents nashville and says obamacare was public for 30 days after weeks of hearings. the republicans have just released their plan and will force a vote on this in two days with the public in the dark. anthony, is that fair comment, is the public in the dark on this? i think this has only come out recently. we just saw the plan last night. so, yes, this is a slightly modified version of earlier plans, it twea ks modified version of earlier plans, it tweaks some things and does some other things but people had not seen this and two days is a rapidly accelerated pace. ithink
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this and two days is a rapidly accelerated pace. i think they feel they have together get the republicans on board and voting for it quickly. they cannot take too much time because then the various factions in the republican party will turn on it quickly. they cannot ta ke will turn on it quickly. they cannot take too much time because then the various factions in the republican party will terminate and advance their own priorities. the problem is thatis their own priorities. the problem is that is already happening. moments ago members of the house freedom caucus, the libertarian representatives held press conference decrying the bill and said they would produce their own straight up repeal of obamacare and not offering to substitute. we are already seeing fraying in the republican caucus. let's pick up on that theme of opposition, you would expect it from democrats but also from republicans as anthony has been explaining. this memo is from the republican study committee group and it has 115 members of congress in it and it describes the tax credits aspect of this new bill as a major concern. it says this is a republican welfare entitlement. i should emphasise, of course, that not all republicans are against
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this, many are supportive of these moves of the trip administration, here is one of them. —— trump administration. the worst thing that obamacare did was put barriers between the patients and their health care professionals, and that is one of the things we have to do, make it more competitive. you will see we are increasing health savings accou nts see we are increasing health savings accounts and giving people tax credits to buy insurance. we want to make sure people have control over their health care, not this cookie cutter approach from washington, dc which says we know best and we will tell you what you need to be doing with your health care. health care is very personal and people want to have control over their health care. let's bring back anthony on this. some people argue they already have control they are just getting a different type of control. that's right, the existing system gives people choices whether it's within the framework of government regulation and what they are trying to do is pare back the government regulation and allow insurance
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providers to offer a wider variety of plans, some of which are less expensive and replace subsidies provided by the government to help pay for insurance with refundable tax credits, as you mentioned. what the republicans are trying to do is keep the popular parts of the existing system while doing away with the parts that are unpopular and that is difficult because those systems fit together into a cohesive whole and as soon as you start picking at one or the other the whole thing kind of falls apart and it makes for some very hard choices. anthony, thank you, i have a feeling we will talk at the same time tomorrow. anthony zurcher from washington. let's talk about brexit. the government has suffered a second defeat in the house of lords. it's the uk's upper house. this is a live feed coming into the newsroom , a this is a live feed coming into the newsroom, a reasonably busy lord's. the debate is still going on. but already the lords have voted to support a "meaningful" parliamentary vote on the final terms of withdrawal. or in other words a a vote after negotiations are complete.
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lord ashdown was one of the those who voted against the government. sorry, it's not parliament'sjob to trust the prime minister. it's parliament's job to hold her to account. look, we've done our parliamentary duty today. brexit debate was all about the sovereignty of parliament and we've taken that seriously and said before this deal is passed it must be passed by parliament. no more no less. let's be clear, none of this. brexit happening but it may impact on how the uk government goes about it. here is the bbc‘s rob watson. the uk government goes about it. here is the bbc's rob watson. what the government wants to do is overturn this completely and you can understand why. potentially this is a hugely significant development because what the house of lords have said is basically we want to have the final say, parliament, said is basically we want to have the finalsay, parliament, on britain's potential deal or a lack ofa britain's potential deal or a lack of a deal with the european union, and that is precisely not what theresa may wanted. she said parliament can have a vote on the
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deal that i do with the eu but it will be a take it or leave it basis. you either like the deal or reject it but if you reject it we just leave the european union without a deal but we still leave what this potentially does is to say no, parliament has the last word. one half of parliament, the house of lords, isn't elected and one half is. surely if it comes to it the commons will have the extra power on this issue. i guess you are probably right. if i had to bet on it i would say the government will probably get its way and the amendment. you must remember a couple of things. first of all, theresa may only has a rather small majority in the house of commons and also have to remember that there is a significant minority of conservative mps who continue to think brexit isjust of conservative mps who continue to think brexit is just about the dumbest thing that ever happened and they have not been happy with the way they have been treated. i guess it is possible they may vote with opposition parties for this
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amendment. a quick word about when article 50 might be triggered. i am sure rumours will be swelling around parliament. what are you hearing? do you have any dates in mind?|j parliament. what are you hearing? do you have any dates in mind? i am so trying to work it out, i cannot plan the rest of my march without it but i've been hearing not next week, probably one of the last two weeks of march. i know that is not very helpful but there you are, that's the best we can hope for. it is important to remember when you think about what happens in the house of lords and this amendment, manner that will delay the start of this process. i am that will delay the start of this process. i am sure that will delay the start of this process. i am sure theresa may will press the firing gun on britain leaving the eu before the end of this month. it is the effect that it could have at the end of the negotiating process in two years' time. outside source will be in the netherlands next week covering the dutch elections. stay with us. we have talked about the scrapping of obamacare and the replacement of it with a new health care system. from
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a political point of view with anthony zurcher. in a couple of minutes we will talk live from new york about this as a business story and how that works. money for new grammar schools in england is to be announced in tomorrow's budget, there will be 140 free schools setup using a budget of £320 million in this parliament and the next. theresa may insists this is part of a plan to make a good education accessible to every child. we have protected the court schools budget but crucially what we are announcing is £500 million of investment in schools, 320 million of which will be in new schools creating 70,000 new school places. what this is about is ensuring people can know that their child will have a good school place and all the opportunities that that provides for them. and among those new schools will be new maths schools like the one i visited,
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kings maths school in london, crucially taking youngsters who are interested in mathematics, giving them the skills for the future. that is what we need to develop. it's about good school places and the right education for every child. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: wikileaks has published thousands of secret documents which it says contain details of hacking methods used by the cia. here are some of the main stories from the world service. burst, an awful story from france. french police say poachers have killed a white rhino and cut off its horn with a chainsaw in a zoo outside paris. it's believed to be the first incident of this type in europe. that is from bbc world news this radio. china has expressed its disapproval after the dalai lama told a us talk show that chinese hardliners are missing the part of their brain that controls common sense. that is from bbc chinese.
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a coroner has found that george michael died of natural causes. he blamed heart and liver disease. more significant progress for iraqi government forces in mosul. this is one of iraq's main cities in the north of the country which has beenin the north of the country which has been in the hands of islamic state for two years. government forces control the east of the city but now they have seized the main government buildings, the courthouse and mosul museum. these are pictures from the bbc archive. this was the museum several years ago. it was attacked by islamic state with many precious artefacts destroyed. the iraqi prime minister has been in mosul and talk to the press earlier. translation: they have two choices, first either
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surrender and receive a fair trial, or the second choice, they will be killed. some rs baking but their escape path is closed and that is why they should surrender —— some are escaping. to understand more about the buildings taken by the iraqi government we asked bbc arabic‘s correspondent to talk to us. they are symbolic, they were almost destroyed, but the importance of it is that they are advancing in areas that are considered very important not strategically but from a symbolic sense. the so—called islamic state is losing on the ground, and actually these buildings we re ground, and actually these buildings were not occupied by the islamic state. now the eyes are focused on the next target, the old city, and the next target, the old city, and the first on the list is the mosque where al baghdadi made his famous speech in 2014. after that maybe we can say we start the countdown of
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islamic state in and moving into the new era that maybe could be not as easy as many expect. the prime minister was talking about some is fighters fleeing the city. yes. if they leave where do they go? this is exactly what i meant when i said the next era could be much more difficult, they could melt in amongst the refugees, and if we go back to the jihadist ideology we have a live example which is al-anda. they can hit and run anywhere and this is much more complicated than having a specific address that you know where they are and everybody who is considering their enemies come after them. now they are targeting mosul and raqqa, but after this they could be anywhere. they could be anyone. this could be much more complicated than many think. we've already talked about the politics of the republicans' new health care plan. now let's talk about the business of it. samira hussein is in new york.
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i guess this new plan has major consequences for insurance companies. absolutely. if you look at the way the stock market has been reacting we see that when it comes to some of the drug makers, their stocks are down, and that's because we saw that president trump tweeted that he's going to try to get the prices of some of those prescription drugs to come down. that has been a big problem, the cost ofjust how expensive it is for americans to get the drugs that they need. what about the drugs that they need. what about the implementation of this? presumably whatever changes come through it will take awhile for businesses to alter how they about selling their products. absolutely. to give you a sense ofjust how massive the health care industry is in the us, it is worth about $3 trillion, and by some estimates by
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next year that's going to represent 18% of america's gdp. so, health ca re 18% of america's gdp. so, health care is just 18% of america's gdp. so, health care isjust a major expense 18% of america's gdp. so, health care is just a major expense too for most americans. this will have a really big impact in terms ofjust how you average american will decide in terms of their finances and where their money goes. in terms of how companies operate within the us health care system, we heard a republican earlier say this needs to be dealt with at a state level, the federal government should be out of it. does that mean each company has to work out 50 or so different ways of operating? right, as soon as you have a company that operates in a few different states it's going to get really complicated because each state, for example the state of new york, is very different than the state of texas, and what the two states may decide as being important for the people who live in that state with regard to health ca re that state with regard to health care could be very different. for
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bigots and police it could become a lot more complicated. —— bigger companies. in their proposal they have taken away the prescription that everyone has to have health care. how that actually impacts the wider economy is still a bit of a question. thank you, samira hussein, live from new york. now let's talk about one of the main stories of yesterday and of this week. the bbc has been speaking to the man in the middle of one of the biggest stories of the year, this is carlos tavares, the ceo of peugeot citroen, which yesterday bought the opel and vauxhall brands, this is the president of the company. it could leave peugeot citroen with overca pacity leave peugeot citroen with overcapacity in europe and job cuts could follow, it is feared. simon jack is at the motor show and had
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the chance to raise the issue with the chance to raise the issue with the man who will be taking the decisions. it is fair to recognise that a big part of the turnaround has already been implement it successfully by the opel vauxhall tea m successfully by the opel vauxhall team with the help of our company, this work is significant but some has already been done. that could have been achieved last year had not the brexit happened and the consequences on the pound. what we have to do now is to complete the turnaround, consolidate the turnaround, consolidate the turnaround of opel—vauc vauxhall and bring the operating profit margin to an appropriate level for this company to be able to generate recurrent positive cash flow. everyone agrees there is overca pacity everyone agrees there is overcapacity in the european market meaning you have to take out cost and eventually if you are honest jobs and plants must go. my answer is much more honest than the way you are asking the question. we're not talking about shutting down plants. why? if you look at the situation
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and the psa group today, our capacity is 98%. it is much lower at vauxhall. it is 8296, first, capacity is 9896. it is much lower at vauxhall. it is 8296, first, it is not a dramatic number, 82% is not dramatic. second, for many, many yea rs dramatic. second, for many, many years opel—vauxhall could not export ca rs years opel—vauxhall could not export cars outside of europe. that was something general motors didn't want them to do. psa is going to unleash this potential but if you want to export we need to be cost competitive, your quality needs to be absolutely superb and your costs need to be competitive, hence the opportunity we have in front of us is improved quality, improved cost, export, be more competitive and altogether by sharing best practice. this is the way that we should look at things. next on outside source we must turn to a bbc investigation into how facebook is still failing to re m ove into how facebook is still failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. you
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may have already seen this on the bbc website. here's the story on our website which tells how a bbc team found a series of sexually suggestive images and reported them to facebook. next, this happened. angus crawford is the reporter on that story and said at facebook‘s request we send them the pictures we have reported which were not taken down by facebook moderators and then facebook reported us to the police. facebook reported us to the police. facebook said today it is against the law for anyone to distribute images of child exploitation. here is the bbc's angus crawford with his full story. the rules are meant to be simple — facebook says it removes nudity or sexually suggestive content. but our investigation last year found paedophiles using secret groups to swap obscene images of children. we informed the police, and this man was sent to prison forfour years. facebook told us it had improved its systems. so, we put that to the test.
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but we still found sexualised images of children, where men posted obscene comments. in every single one of these images, there is a real child who is out there today — at school, probably — and they don't know that their image is being used in this way. it is used and commented on by a paedophile that child is abused again. we reported 100 posts that appeared to break facebook‘s own guidelines. only 18 were taken down. 82 images stayed up. they didn't breach facebook‘s community standards. i find it very disturbing. i find that content unacceptable. unconcerned that has been brought to facebook's attention and has not been addressed. and this report, this investigation, it casts grave doubt on the effectiveness of the measures that facebook has in place. one former insider says moderation is a huge task. i think the biggest challenge
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here is one of scale. no—one has ever policed a site as large as facebook. 1.8 billion people using facebook every month means the company is effectively running the largest police force is the world has ever seen. facebook asked us to send them examples of what we had reported, so we did. the company then reported us to the police. facebook issued a statement, saying: we have carefully reviewed the content referred to us and have now removed all the items that were illegal or against our standards. it is against the law for anyone to distribute images of child exploitation. this matter is now in the hands of the authorities. so, where does this leave concerned parents? it sends a very clear message that, actually, you can't trust facebook's reporting mechanism, and i think parents get that message already. there are many parents who contact
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us there are many parents who contact us and said they tried to raise an issue with facebook and didn't get anywhere. it will reinforce many pa re nts' anywhere. it will reinforce many parents' existing experience. even now, groups with inappropriate images and comments about children remain on facebook. questions about how the company moderates content just won't go away. angus crawford, bbc news. asi as i was saying there is more information on angus's investigation online and on the bbc news website. in the last few seconds of this programme, let me tell you that arsenal are not having much fun at home to bayern munich in the second leg of their last 16 champions league tie, they are losing 4—1. they are going out to a huge deficit. find out more on os sport inafew deficit. find out more on os sport in a few minutes time. if you were watching yesterday you
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will know there was a variety of impactful weather occurring around the world, let's start with the main event, the cyclone ploughing its way into north—eastern parts of madagascar, it made landfall in early morning, you can see the distinct lines of the storm, this was a powerful storm and made la ndfall was a powerful storm and made landfall with violent winds. the winds are still an issue but in terms of impact over the next day or two the winds will become less of an issue but the rainfall will not, major flooding likely, issue but the rainfall will not, majorflooding likely, the possibility of some serious landslides. it is a life—threatening storm. the storm will track southwards, not far away from the capital through wednesday and on tuesdayit capital through wednesday and on tuesday it will head down to the south coast and should clear into the sea by about friday. two or three days in which the storm is crossing madagascar, we will keep a close eye on that storm. bills were
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across africa, downpours across the interior of southern africa, in cape town it has been a dry spell of weather. north africa, dry, gusty winds on the mediterranean coast as we will see. stateside we have severe weather across this frontal band. what i mean by severe weather is torrential downpours, large hail and one or two embedded tornadoes as well, and that is the prospect for the next few hours as the frontal system continues to track across the midwest. it stretches all the way from the deep south to the great la kes. from the deep south to the great lakes. to the east of that it is dry for the time being but this front will continue spreading towards the eastern seaboard, so a change in the weather for the big eastern seaboard, so a change in the weatherfor the big cities here. behind that things settle down but a cold wind coming down across the great lakes, yet more mountain snow. for the rockies it has been such a snowy winter with more snowfall as if we needed it across this part of the world. that is the setup in
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north america, let's go down to australasia where we have had another cyclone bringing heavy rain to the north—west of australia, continuing to be a threat with flooding. it is dry across most of southern australia. into india, some further showers up towards the north—eastern states, and increasing range and snow. i mentioned the strong winds in africa. we have a huge area of low pressure across the central mediterranean which continues to move south—eastwards. the strong winds are battering parts of sicily and malta and will head down to the coast of libya, western egypt and turn very wild across parts of greece and in two parts of western turkey, as this low pressure continues to track east. it settles down across spain and portugal meanwhile. hello, this is outside source. these are the main stories here in the bbc news room. wikilea ks are the main stories here in the bbc news room. wikileaks has published
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documents which it says contain details of hacking methods used by the cia. after a long silence, the us state department has held its first press conference since president trump took office. barbara plett usher was there. she will be here live to tell us what was said. japan says north korea has entered a new stage of threat, since it launched four ballistic missiles towards the sea of japan. we'll do a bbc reality check on whether that can be said to be true. and in outside source sport. it's been a chastening evening for arsenal. thrashed at home by bayern munich in the champions league. not long since they were thrashed at bayern munich in much the same fashion.
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